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A Higher Form of Killing: Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare #2020

A Higher Form of Killing Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare Between April and May Western civilization was shocked World War I was already appalling in its brutality but it had until then been fought on the battlefield and by rules long agreed by

  • Title: A Higher Form of Killing: Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare
  • Author: Diana Preston
  • ISBN: 9781620402122
  • Page: 286
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A Higher Form of Killing: Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare By Diana Preston, Between April 22 and May 30, 1915, Western civilization was shocked World War I was already appalling in its brutality, but it had until then been fought on the battlefield and by rules long agreed by convention Suddenly those rules were abandoned when Germany forever altered the way war would be fought On April 22, at Ypres, German canisters spewed poison gas at FrenchBetween April 22 and May 30, 1915, Western civilization was shocked World War I was already appalling in its brutality, but it had until then been fought on the battlefield and by rules long agreed by convention Suddenly those rules were abandoned when Germany forever altered the way war would be fought On April 22, at Ypres, German canisters spewed poison gas at French and Canadian soldiers in their trenches on May 7, the German submarine, U 20, without warning, torpedoed the passenger liner Lusitania, killing 1,198 civilians and on May 31, a German zeppelin began the first aerial bombardment of London and its inhabitants Each of these actions violated rules of war carefully agreed to at the Hague Conventions of 1898 and 1907 and were deliberately breached by Germany in an attempt to spread terror and force the Allies to surrender While that failed, the psychological damage caused by these attacks far outweighed the casualties The era of weapons of mass destruction had dawned.While each of these momentous events has been chronicled in histories of the war, celebrated historian Diana Preston links them for the first time, revealing the dramatic stories and the personalities behind them through the eyes of those who were there whether making the decisions to use the weapons or experiencing their horrifying effect in the trenches, on board the Lusitania or on the streets of London Placing the attacks in the context of the centuries old debate over what constitutes just war, Preston shows how, in their aftermath, the other combatants felt the necessity to develop extreme weapons of their own In our current time of terror, when weapons of mass destruction are once again implemented and threatened and wartime atrocities abound in a very different kind of conflict, the vivid story of their birth is of great relevance.

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      Published :2019-06-07T18:33:39+00:00

    1 thought on “A Higher Form of Killing: Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare

    1. A Higher Form of Killing Six Weeks in World War I that Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare by Diane Preston is an account of the changes in traditions of warfare that took place between April and May 1915 Preston is an Oxford educated historian whose career was in print journalism in the UK and the US She also was a broadcaster for the BBC and CBC Nearly a decade ago Preston began writing popular history, covering subjects that are compelling, but also relate to the human experience Her topics [...]

    2. The attention to detail especially in such a close focus on very specific aspects of World War One is really very impressive That s a bit of the issue, as well, though sometimes there are just so many quotations and references to minute detail that it s hard not to get bogged down while reading Nonetheless, if this is a subject you re interested in, this would be a great book to read.

    3. Diana Preston takes three seemingly unrelated events of 1915 to weave a tale that is a thrilling, informative, and interesting history Generally the first use of poison gas, the sinking of the Lusitania, and the bombing of London by Zeppelins are examined as singular events, but Preston demonstrates how these events were catalysts in overturning long held views on the conduct of war, a flouting of the Hague Conventions rules of war, and an escalation of scientific warfare that continues to reson [...]

    4. When I first heard of the passenger liner Lusitania, it was the answer to a Trivial Pursuit question In A Higher Form of Killing Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare, Diana Preston vividly paints a detailed picture of European countries grappling with changing rules of warfare and the reaction of the world at large to that terrible tragedy Although Preston provides context for the rules of war that existed from centuries before up to her timeframe of interest, she [...]

    5. A very good summary history of WWI military techWith the ground war in stalemate by the end of 1914, Germany, faced with a naval blockade and time not on their side, tried to break Allied will with three technologies that would change war forever Submarines, aerial bombardment, and poison gas came to be used at an increasing scale through the war s middle period of 1915 1917 While other developments were equally destructive, these three brought the concept of mass destruction into the calculus o [...]

    6. The emphasis in this book is on three major ways in which warfare changed in the year 1915 While these three new methods of fighting a war had already been examined in science fiction and other literature and some had already been used to a small extent, the world was still stunned by the extent of the death and destruction All of this was due to the fact that the war was being fought by modern, efficient industrial states and they brought those resources into play in order to weaken their oppon [...]

    7. Early in World War One between April 22nd and May 30th, 1915 only 8 months after the start of the war there were three major events using weapons never used before in the history of warfare Dianna Preston s new book is the story of these three told with exceptional detail and interesting research No doubt the Germans are the villains here but Preston does not hold anyone blameless for how they adopted and further developed even horrific forms of mass killing.First at Ypres was the use by German [...]

    8. In A Higher Form of Killing , Ms Preston chooses three new developments in military killing that marked WWI They were the submarine, use by Germany to attack any shipping which would support Great Britian s war effort the Zeppelin, used to bring home the horror of war to the British homeland which had not been attacked if I remember my history correctly since the days of Napoleon and poison gas, used first by the Germans and then by all combatants to kill and to paralyze with fear enemy soldiers [...]

    9. Very good read Superbly researched, well paced, with a clear thesis and support for that thesis But it reads as than simple history, though Diane Preston proves again that she s a superlative historian She also has a fine understanding of storytelling The individuals she expands on gave the narrative just the right touch, elevating this work from that simple history to a story with human personality The diary excerpts and personal correspondence the author includes made a nice counterpoint to t [...]

    10. I won this book through GoodReads First Reads giveaways A Higher Form of Killing Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed The Nature of Warefare by Diana Preston is an excellent book During a six week period in 1915, the Germany s usage of poison gas, the U boat torpedo and the zeppelins forever changed warefare and how wars would be fought in the future On April 22 at Ypres, the Germans used poison gas on the French and Canadian soldiers on May 7th, the German submarine U20 sunk the passen [...]

    11. The subtitle to the book Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed the Nature of Warfare is an apt description of the narrative of the book.The author posits that there were three events 1 The use of poison gas in the trenches of France and the Eastern Front 2 Unrestricted submarine warfare as exemplified by the sinking of the Lusitania and 3 Aerial bombing of cities and unarmed areas as exemplified by the bombing of London.It s difficult to argue with the author s views Everything was preci [...]

    12. Inside six weeks of 1915 three benchmarks of warfare were passed when Germany used poison gas in France, sank the Lusitania, and bombed London from airships Preston also mentions in passing that it was during this period when the Turks genocide of Armenians began The author investigates all three of Germany s war actions carefully I think she is particularly good on the Lusitania but while this is interesting enough history her larger aim was to show how these actions changed warfare in the futu [...]

    13. An amazing book It tells the tale of six weeks in World War I that would shape all wars to come On April 22, 1915 the Germans employed a deadly new secret weapon to break the deadlock on the western front poison gas Two weeks later they sank the Lusitania and not long after that they dropped bombs on London These were all in violation of agreements made at the Hague in 1898 about how war should be fought The result was a much dirtier form of warfare for the rest of the war and for wars to come T [...]

    14. The book is ok The research on the three events German use of gas at Ypres, U boat sinking of the Lusitania, and Zeppelin bombing of London is fairly strong, but I m not sure what her thesis is The claim that these events fundamentally changed warfare fails to land Technology is constantly changing warfare, but few would describe it as fundamental Napoleon s popular conscription policy, or the effect of industrialization, or even T.E Lawrence s ideas on guerrilla campaigns, could perhaps be said [...]

    15. Diana Preston s well researched history succeeds in showing how the use of 3 new scientific advancements military techniques in World War I changed the face of modern war forever Of course societies have always sought technical and strategic advantages over their enemies in war, but Preston shows how unprecedented scientific and technological advancement made man a efficient killing machine Her thesis is well founded in the specific context of World War I but also speaks to an inherent flaw in [...]

    16. Depressing but informative Wars start with beliefs somethings are beyond the pale but wars end with those things being accepted practice The only thing that stopped gas being accepted during the second world war was the risk of retaliation in kind Unrestricted submarine warfare and the bombing of civilian areas all became accepted means of conducting war I think it was Richard Crossman who after seeing Dachau said that civilization was a crust on which covered the deeper evil passions of mankind [...]

    17. If you read Lusitania by the author or Erik Larsen s Dead Wake much of what of what was written in this book is a rehash of those two book The author didn t try very hard to change the slant of the Lusitania part of her book I did appreciate her telling of the bombing of London which I knew happen but didn t know any of the gory details Likewise with the use of poison gas For me the bottom line is humanity was always try to make war as horrible as possible no matter what technology is available [...]

    18. I confess to not knowing much about WWI Assassination of Archduke Ferdinand but went would this trigger such a big war Sinking of the Lusitania Erik Larson s Dead Wake brought me up to speed on that Use of gas why Zeppelins I knew what they were but not how they were used This book filled in a lot of holes for me If you re already well versed on WWI, I don t know that this book will add much to your knowledge If all you know are what remains of what you learned in high school, this book will be [...]

    19. I won this book through GoodReads First Reads giveaways A Higher Form of Killing Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed The Nature of Warefare by Diana Preston is a fantastic non fiction read released to coincide with the 100 year anniversary of Germany s use of new warfare tactics during WWI The narrative style use of embedded quotations from diaries, newspapers and other sources makes the book an easy read The book provides a cogent discussion of the development and attempt to constrain [...]

    20. Not for the casual reader If you are interested in history, particularly the history of war, then, this is a book you won t want to pass up reading My husband is an amateur war history buff and grabbed this book before I could start reading Even he learned things he had not known.There are a number of reviews that tell you much You will want to take the time to read them.For me, this book was a bit dry, and rather text booky,, but it was also very informative Hence, the 4 rating.

    21. I received this book from a giveaway I give this book 3 out of 5 stars because some words were not printed all the way and some were not spaced out Other than that I liked the book In school you only ever learn about the assassination of Franz Ferdinand being the start of WWI but nothing else It s always about WWII I learned so much about WWI in this book It s astonishing that it s been 100 years since the start of WWI I would recommend this book to anyone interested in history, WWI, or weapons [...]

    22. Preston s whistle stop tour of three facets of warfare introduced by the Germans in the early months of 1915 unrestricted submarine attacks, bombing by airship and the the use of gas on the Western Front is entertaining enough Unfortunately, it suffers in comparison to another, far superior, book of the same name by Jeremy Paxman and Robert Harris, which examines the history of chemical warfare in a deeper and elegant way.

    23. Full disclosure I won an advance reader copy of this book through a Firstreads Giveaway A Higher Form of Killing Six Weeks in World War I That Forever Changed The Nature of warfare is historian Diana Preston s look at six weeks in 2015 in which the German s escalated WWI through the use of poison gas, submarine warfare against unarmed shipping without warning, and the use of dirigibles for civilian bombing.

    24. The writing was rather mechanical and dry but there were strong spots The analysis of the sinking of the Zeppelin bombings in England and the sinking of the Lusitania was solid although I am not sure we needed to know who was eating eggs Those kind of details tended to stray from the main theme of the horror of the new types of warfare and didn t add to the narrative.Okay, but the book by Robert Harris of the same title was much better and informative.

    25. A truly chilling and gritty account of World War I and the weaponry used that has now become common practice for mass destruction A must read for any history buff, political buff, and political science scholar Truly invaluable insight for an International Relations major such as myself.An Advanced Readers Copy was provided by the publisher in return for an honest review.

    26. An impressive account of how warfare became lethal, especially for civilian populations, with the introductions of aerial bombardment, poison gas, and unrestricted submarine attacks during World War I.

    27. It was a good book The book is focused on a few weapons of mass destruction in World War I These weapons were poison gas, air bombings of civilians and submarine attacks on civilian ships Many of the issues in the book are still relevant today.

    28. Informative account of the Germans use of gas, u boats, and civilian bombing, by zeppelins, all initiated early in World War I Although deplored by the allies as contravening early conventions on warfare, they soon copied and used themselves.

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